transient

transient
transient adj Transient, transitory, passing, ephemeral, momentary, fugitive, fleeting, evanescent, short-lived are comparable when they mean lasting or staying only for a short time. Transient and transitory are often used as if they were interchangeable; but transient more frequently applies to what is actually short in its duration or stay
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the summer hotel does not take transient guests

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transient sorrows— Wordsworth

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an ancient folk tradition whose transient resting-place was the Bronx— Geismar

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and transitory, like its close synonym passing, to what is by its nature or essence bound to change, pass, or come to an end sooner or later
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objects of sense . . . are transitory and ephemeral— Thilly

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wise men will apply their remedies to . . . the causes of evil which are permanent, not to . . . the transitory modes in which they appear— Burke

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a passing fancy

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the confounding of the Passing with the Permanent— Austin

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Ephemeral may imply existence for only a day
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ephemeral insects

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ephemeral flowers

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In extended use, it implies marked shortness of life or of duration (as of influence or appeal)
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jazz is perishable, ephemeral, elusive— Balliett

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Momentary implies duration for a moment or a similar very short time
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a momentary irritation— Hardy

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Fugitive and fleeting apply to what passes swiftly, and is gone; but fugitive carries a stronger implication of the difficulty of catching or fixing
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oh joy! . . . that nature yet remembers what was so fugitive\—Wordsworth

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both crucifix and river . . . offered contentment and poignant, fugitive hints of another world— Styron

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and fleeting, of the impossibility of holding back or restraining from flight
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a calm and studious expression, but touched with a curious, fleeting light of triumph— Styron

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a fleeting wisdom told her that. . . one does not love another for his good character— Hervey

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Evanescent implies momentariness, but it stresses quick and complete vanishing, and it usually connotes a delicate, fragile, or airy quality
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evanescent visitations of thought and feeling . . . arising unforeseen and departing unbidden— Shelley

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all was unstable; quivering as leaves, evanescent as lightning— Hardy

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it is poetry of the most evanescent type, so tenuous in thought and feeling that only the most exquisite diction can justify its perpetuation in cold print— Grandgent

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Short-lived implies extreme brevity of life or existence often of what might be expected to last or live longer
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short-lived fame

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their satisfaction was short-lived

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trade unions have pressed their demands regardless of the fact that sellers' market conditions would be short-livedThe Scotsman

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Antonyms: perpetual
Contrasted words: *lasting, permanent, perdurable, stable, durable

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

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  • Transient — Tran sient, a. [L. transiens, entis, p. pr. of transire, transitum, to go or pass over. See {Trance}.] 1. Passing before the sight or perception, or, as it were, moving over or across a space or scene viewed, and then disappearing; hence, of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • transient — tran‧si‧ent [ˈtrænziənt ǁ ˈtrænʆnt] adjective formal only lasting for a short period of time: • Customer loyalty in the health drinks market appears transient at the best of times. * * * transient UK US /ˈtrænziənt/ adjective ► something that is …   Financial and business terms

  • Transient — bzw. Transienz, teilweise nur als Adjektiv transient (engl. „vorübergehend“, alle zu lat. transire vorbeigehen) steht: im Ingenieurwesen allgemein für den statistischen Begriff instationär in der Informatik für zeitlich begrenzt in den Speicher… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • transient — [tran′shənt, tran′sē ənt; tran′zhənt, tran′zē ənt] adj. [L transiens, prp. of transire: see TRANSIT] 1. a) passing away with time; not permanent; temporary; transitory b) passing quickly or soon; fleeting; ephemeral ☆ 2. staying only for a short… …   English World dictionary

  • transient — transient, transitory Both words mean ‘brief, fleeting’, with transient conveying rather more strongly the notion of people or things ‘passing through’ while transitory denotes temporary situations that are more static: • The highly transient… …   Modern English usage

  • transient — (adj.) c.1600, from L. transiens (acc. transientem) passing over or away, prp. of transire cross over, pass away, from trans across (see TRANS (Cf. trans )) + ire to go (see ION (Cf. ion)). The noun is first attested 1650s; specific sense of …   Etymology dictionary

  • transient — ► ADJECTIVE 1) lasting only for a short time. 2) staying or working in a place for a short time only. ► NOUN ▪ a transient person. DERIVATIVES transience noun transiency noun transiently adverb …   English terms dictionary

  • Transient — Tran sient, n. That which remains but for a brief time. Glanvill. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Transĭent — (lat.), der Gegensatz zu »immanent« (s. d. und Transĕunt) …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • transient — I adjective brevis, brief, caducous, deciduous, elusive, ephemeral, ephemerous, evanescent, fading, fleeting, fluxus, fugacious, fugax, fugitive, hasty, impermanent, inconstant, interim, meteoric, migratory, momentary, passing, perishable,… …   Law dictionary

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